Keynote Speakers

Dr. Adriano Camps

Dr. Adriano Camps

Dr. Adriano Camps

Department of Signal Theory and Communications, UPC, España

Adriano Camps (F’2011) was born in Barcelona, Spain, in 1969. He received the degree in Telecommunications Engineering and Ph.D. degree in Telecommunications Engineering from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. In 1991 to 1992, he was at the ENS des Télécommunications de Bretagne, France, with an Erasmus Fellowship. Since 1993, he has been with the Electromagnetics and Photonics Engineering Group, Department of Signal Theory and Communications, UPC, where he was first Assistant Professor, Associate Professor in 1997, and Full Professor since 2007. In 1999, he was on sabbatical leave at the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Since 1993, he has been strongly involved in the European Space Agency SMOS Earth Explorer Mission, from the instrument and algorithmic points of view, performing field experiments, and since 2001 studying the use of GNSS-R techniques to perform the sea state correction needed to retrieve salinity from L-band radiometric observations. His research interests are focused in microwave remote sensing, with special emphasis in microwave radiometry by aperture synthesis techniques and remote sensing using signals of opportunity (GNSS-R). At the time of writting this CV, he has published over 183 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 6 book chapters, 1 book, and more than 397 international conference presentations, holds 10 patents, and has advised 23 Ph. D. Thesis students (+ 8 on-going), and more than 120 final project and M.Eng. Theses. According to Publish or Perish (Google Scholar) his publications have received more than 6178 citations, and his h-index is 31 (Thompson Reuters) or 39 (Google Scholar).

Adriano Camps is currently the Scientific Coordinator of the CommSensLab "María de Maeztu" Excellence Research Unit, he co-leads the Remote Sensing Lab (www.tsc.upc.edu/rs) and the UPC NanoSat Lab (http://www.tsc.upc.edu/nanosatlab). He is the PI of the first UPC nano-satellites: 1) 3Cat-1, a 1U CubeSat with 7 small technology demonstrators and scientific payloads, 2) 3Cat-2, a 6U CubeSat with the first dual-frequency dual-polarization GNSS-R payload, launched on August 15th 2016 using a Chinese LM-D2 rocket, 3) 3Cat-4, a 1U Cubesat with a software defined radio to implement a microwave radiometer, a GNSS-Reflectomer, and an AIS receiver, and 4) FSSCAT, a tandem mission formed by two 6U CubeSats, overall winner of the Copernicus masters competition 2017.

He was Chair of uCal 2001, member of the IGARSS Technical Program Committee since 2002, IGARSS 2007 Technical Program Committee Co-chair, co-chair of GNSS-R’10, and he will be co-chair of IGARSS 2020. He was Associate Editor of Radio Science, IEEE Gesocience and Remote Sensing Letters, and he is currently Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. He was the President-Founder of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Chapter at Spain. He has been member of the IEEE Gesocience and Remote Sensing Society Administrative Commitee since 2002, where he has been the Newsletter Editor, the web editor, VicePresident of Information Resources, VicePresident of Meetings and Symposia, Executive Vice President, and in 2017 and 2018 President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society.

Dr. Alberto Moreira

Dr. Alberto Moreira

Dr. Alberto Moreira

German Aerospace Center – DLR, Alemania

Alberto Moreira was born in São José dos Campos, Brazil, 1962. He received the B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. degrees from the Aeronautical Technological Institute (ITA), São José dos Campos, in 1984 and 1986, respectively, and the Eng. Dr. degree (with honors) from the Technical University of Munich, Germany, in 1993. From 1996 to 2001, he was the Chief Scientist and Engineer with the SAR Technology Department, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Under his leadership, the DLR airborne SAR system has been upgraded to operate in innovative imaging modes like polarimetric SAR interferometry and SAR tomography. Since 2001, he has been the Director of the Microwaves and Radar Institute at DLR and a full Professor with the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in the field of microwave remote sensing. The Institute contributes to several scientific programs and space projects for actual and future airborne and spaceborne SAR missions like TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, SAR-Lupe and SAR-Lupe follow-on as well as Sentinel-1, BIOMASS and Tandem-L. The mission TanDEM-X, led by his Institute, has generated a global, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth with unprecedented accuracy. Prof. Moreira is the initiator and Principal Investigator for this mission as well as for the mission proposal Tandem-L. He and his co-workers have also led the development of digital beamforming for imaging radar systems, a technology that is now being adopted for the next generation of spaceborne SAR systems for global mapping of the Earth environment and its dynamics.

Prof. Moreira is author or co‐author of more than 350 publications in international conferences and journals, 8 book chapters and is holder of 18 patents in the radar and antenna field. Several innovations and patented algorithms of Prof. Moreira are being used for formation flight of the TanDEM-X mission as well as for the data processing of all ScanSAR and spotlight SAR images of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X data. His professional interests and research areas encompass radar end-to-end system design and analysis, innovative microwave techniques and system concepts, signal processing, and remote sensing applications. He has supervised or co-supervised more than 30 PhD students and has been lecturing at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology on spaceborne SAR remote sensing since 2003. He has regularly served as a lecturer in international courses and summer schools on Synthetic Aperture Radar since 1992.

Prof. Moreira is an IEEE fellow and has served as President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) in 2010. He has been a member of the IEEE GRSS Administrative Committee (1999 – 2001, 2004 – 2013), was the Founder and Chair of the GRSS German Chapter (2003 – 2008) and Associate Editor for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters (2003 – 2007) and for the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (since 2005). He and his colleagues received the IEEE GRSS Transactions Prize Paper Awards in 1997, 2001, and 2007, the IEEE GRSS Letters Prize Paper Award in 2015 and 2017, the Certificate of Recognition of TanDEM-X Achievements and Impact presented at the European SAR conference in 2012, and the IEEE W.R.G. Baker Award from the IEEE Board of Directors in 2012. He is also the recipient of the DLR Science Award (1995), IEEE Nathanson Award for the Young Radar Engineer of the Year (1999), the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Field Award (2007), and the IEEE GRSS Distinguished Achievement Award (2014). He served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Information Technology Society of the German Association for Electrical, Electronic and Information Technologies (2003 – 2008), as chair of the Scientific and Technical Council of DLR (2009 – 2011), Spokesman of the Leadership Circle of DLR at Oberpfaffenhofen (2009 – 2011) and as chair of the DLR’s Center of Excellence on Synthetic Aperture Radar (2000 – 2015). He has participated as a member of the technical program committee of more than 50 conferences and has contributed to the successful series of the European SAR conferences (EUSAR) since 1996 as a member of the Technical Program Committee, Technical Chairman (2000), Awards Chairman (2002–2004), General Chairman (2006), and Co-Chairman (2008) and has served as Co-Chair of the European Radar Conference (EuRAD’07) and as General Co-Chair for the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS’12) in Munich. Since 2012 he is serving as the Principal Investigator (PI) for the Helmholtz-Alliance “Remote Sensing for Earth System Dynamics”, comprising of 18 international research institutes and 30 associated partners.

Dr. Carlos López-Martínez

Dr. Carlos López-Martínez

Dr. Carlos López-Martínez

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, España

Associate Professor at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in the area of Remote Sensing, Radar and Microwaves. He has built my experience at different universities and organizations in Spain, France, Germany and Luxembourg. Previosly, headed the Remote Sensing and Natural Resources Modelling team at the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology. Research in Remote Sensing, mainly in active microwave remote sensing with Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR). interests also cover other remote sensing imaging technologies and the combined use for environmental monitoring and to mitigare climate change effects AND main contributions cover:

  • SAR Polarimetry (PolSAR), with contributions in theoretical and applicative aspects (forestry, agriculture and vegetation, wetlands, snow and ice characterization, soil moisture), contributing to demonstrate that polarimetry is an asset of SAR technology.
  • Understanding, characterization, processing and exploitation of SAR, Interferometric SAR, PolSAR, Polarimetric SAR Interferometric, Tomographic SAR data and multitemporal SAR data.
  • Analysis of speckle noise effects on the extraction of quantitative information from SAR data data.
  • Single-polarization and PolSAR image analysis based on transformed domains. My works has contributed to the use of the Wavelet Transform for InSAR data and the introduction of the Binary Partition Trees as efficient tool for the exploitation of multidimensional SAR data.
  • Ship and oil spills detection.
  • Exploitation of polarimetric diversity in Differential SAR Interferometry to improve the estimation of terrain subsidence.
  • Design, analysis and exploitation of SAR sensors. I have participated in the design of ground based SAR sensors in monostatic and bistatic geometries and the exploitation of SAR sensors onboard UAV platforms and. I have contributed in the Spanish PAZ X-band and the ESA L-band SAOCOM-CS missions.

Dr. Michal Shimoni

Dr. Michal Shimoni

Dr. Michal Shimoni

The Signal and Image Centre of the Belgian Royal Military Academy, Belgium

Michal Shimoni is a senior researcher and project officer in the hyperspectral unit of the Belgian Royal Military Academy, Brussels, Belgium. She has more than 20 years of experience with the exploitation of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for civil and security applications. Her research covers difficult target detection in complex environments; atmospheric modeling; mixing models and validations; thermal HSI; chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) detection-based spectroscopy; and fusion algorithms. She participated in and coordinated several projects with the European Space Agency, European Commission, European Defence Agency, Belgian Defence/Belgian Science Policy frameworks, and several North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Science and Technology Organization programs. She received the 2017 NATO Science and Technology Award for her work with SET-190-thermal HSI phenomenology. (Based on document published on 17 June 2019). Publication Topics: Geophysical image processing, Big Data, geographic information systems, image classification, sensor fusion, synthetic aperture radar, Bayes methods, buildings (structures), convergence, crowdsourcing, deformation, demography, Feature extraction, geomorphology, geophysics computing, hyper spectral imaging, image fusion, image resolution, image restoration, iterative methods, land cover, land use, learning (artificial intelligence), military computing, radar interferometry.

Dr. Paolo Gamba

Dr. Paolo Gamba

Dr. Paolo Gamba

Iniversità di Pavia, Italy

Paolo Gamba is currently Full Professor of Telecommunications at the University of Pavia, Italy. He received the Laurea degree in Electronic Engineering “cum laude” from the University of Pavia, Italy, in 1989, and the Ph.D. degree in Electronic Engineering from the same University in 1993. He is a Fellow of IEEE, and from 2009 to 2013 he has served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters. He has been member of the AdCom and Chapter Committee Chair for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society from 2014 to 2016, Latin American activity Liaison in the same period, has served in 2016 as Vice President for Professional Activities, and is currently Executive Vice President of the same Society.

He has been the organizer and Technical Chair of the biennial GRSS/ISPRS Joint Workshops on “Remote Sensing and Data Fusion over Urban Areas” since 2001 until 2015. He also served as Technical Co-Chair of the 2010 and 2015 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, respectively in Honolulu, Hawaii, and Milan, Italy, and is meant to serve as Technical Co-Chair for the same conference in 2020, too.

He has been Chair of Technical Committee 7 “Pattern Recognition in Remote Sensing” of the International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR) from October 2002 to October 2004 and Chair of the Data Fusion Committee of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society from October 2005 to May 2009.

He has been the Guest Editor of special issues of IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Earth Observation and Applied Remote Sensing, ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, International Journal of Information Fusion, Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, and Pattern Recognition Letters on the topics of Urban Remote Sensing, Remote Sensing for Disaster Management, Pattern Recognition in Remote Sensing Applications, Data Fusion, and Hyperspectral Urban Remote Sensing.

He has been invited to give keynote lectures and tutorials in several occasions about urban remote sensing, data fusion, EO data and risk management. He published more than 130 papers in international peer-review journals and presented nearly 290 research works in workshops and conferences.

Research Interests

  1. Design of efficient algorithms to analyse EO data and extract feature to characterize urban areas and in general human settlements at multiple spatial scales and spectral wavelengths.
  2. Design of data fusion techniques to exploit information coming from multiple EO and in situ data sources for environmental risk models at local, regional and global scale.
    • feature extraction, selection and combination procedures to evaluate spectral, spatial and temporal characteristics of each available data source for their comparison (e.g. change detection) or synergetic use (e.g. multivariate regression);
    • fusion of features by means of algorithms able to reconcile multiple features from both homogeneous and heterogeneous data sources (e.g. 2D/3D, vector and raster, ...) and/or different scales via inference or aggregation schemes.
  3. Development of novel tools to extract quantitative parameters from remotely sensed data and to link the extracted information to risk and environmental models.
    • classification, mapping and geospatial data fusion procedures for the retrieval of parameters and information layers essential to understand the above mentioned processes
    • signal and image processing in high dimensional spaces, applications in very high resolution remote sensing.

Dr. Peng Gong

Dr. Peng Gong

Dr. Peng Gong

Tsinghua University, China

Professor Peng Gong, Director of the Centre for Earth System Science at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, is one of the Co-Chairs of the Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change. As such he's had a key role in compiling its new report. But had it not been for a chance decision made some 35 years ago by an anonymous Chinese bureaucrat, he would almost certainly be working in some other branch of science.

As a would-be student Gong had applied to study physics; instead, he was allocated a Nanjing University place in geography. Among the first generation of his farming family to go to university, he swallowed his initial disappointment, no doubt recognising that a few years earlier his chances of getting any kind of higher education would have been slim. As it was, his student dissertation on the development of software for aerial mapping sparked an interest in remote sensing methods and their application. This led to a masters degree in which he explored remote sensing in the analysis of urban land use. From Nanjing, he went to the University of Waterloo in Canada to do a PhD on the more general place of satellite data in classifying land. With the future direction of his career now firmly set, he spent the next 20 plus years in teaching and research, first at the University of Alberta and then, from 1994, at the University of California, Berkeley, USA, where he became a full professor in 2001. Gong entered remote sensing at just the right time, according to Professor Gregory Biging of Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. “He came to it when the technology was beginning to make the transition from a military thing to a civilian one.”

It was through colleagues at Berkeley—and particularly the man he views as his mentor, Professor Robert Spear—that Gong became interested not only in environmental changes themselves, but in their consequences for human health. Spear, who works in Berkeley's School of Public Health, needed someone with whom to collaborate in a research programme on environmental factors in the transmission of schistosomiasis in China. He wanted better data on the location of the sites of infection, and also felt that satellite imagery had a part to play in fully understanding the disease. Gong, he says, was the man to help. The collaboration, which was successful, gave Gong himself a broader view of his work. “It helped me to understand that we need to treat a lot of problems not through one discipline but through a multidisciplinary perspective”, he says. As Biging points out, remote sensing is a technology with many applications. “Peng's amassed so much knowledge in so many fields that he's now incredibly good at working across disciplines.” His remote sensing covers features of the urban as well as the natural environment. “But he's more than just a user of the technology”, Biging notes. “He's very innovative. He's developed a lot of new techniques and new statistical approaches to improve our use of remote sensing.” In short, he's one of the go-to people if you've got a new problem for which remote sensing might offer a solution.

Gong is now back in China. “I never thought of leaving it forever”, he says. “It was natural for me to want to go back.” He'd always kept in touch, from the 1990s onward becoming involved with the creation and staffing of various new research institutions in China, and arranging exchanges between overseas Chinese researchers and their counterparts back home. In 2014, he relinquished his chair at Berkeley and took up his present Tsinghua University job full time. “He understands how to operate in the Chinese and the western system”, says Spear. At the Centre for Earth System Science, Gong and his colleagues monitor environmental change, support climate change modelling, and study the impact of such change on sustainability and on human health.

As a member of the Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change, Gong sees the health impact of climate change as having a central role in climate research. “But I think in many parts of the world we need to do more to make politicians and decision makers pay attention to health risks.” He hopes the Commission's report will help move this agenda forwards. But is he optimistic? He points to discussions with US schools of public health initiated by President Barack Obama as a hopeful sign. What of the Chinese Government? “It certainly recognises the impact of pollution on health, and is trying to do something about it.” He glances up to look out through his office window. “I've noticed the change in Beijing. I think the air quality is getting better. I can see blue sky.” But he still concedes that it's hard to be entirely optimistic.

“Peng's very easy to get along with”, says Biging. “It's really nice to sit down and just talk with him. Even though he has an enviable résumé he displays none of the big ego you find in some people with achievements like his. He's very approachable, he's open, he has a flexible and quick mind.” A hard worker? “I don't think I've ever seen him not working.” So what does Gong do when he's not at work? He enjoys travelling, he says, seeing different cultures. But as he begins to talk of travel it's in the context of research that involves mapping change on a global scale. You realise that even this is linked to work. Beijing, for the foreseeable future, will remain his base. “In the next few years, I need to build the Earth System Science programme at Tsinghua University.” Does he miss California? “Sometimes.” He laughs. “When the air pollution is bad I miss California.”

Dr. Christian Heipke

Dr. Christian Heipke

Dr. Christian Heipke

Leibniz University Hannover, Alemania

Christian Heipke was born in Lüneburg, Germany in 1961. From 1980 to 1986 he studied Geodetic Sciences and Surveying at the universities of Hannover, Sydney, and Munich. He graduated from the Technical University Munich and subsequently joined the Industrieanlagen-Betriebsgesellschaft (IABG), Ottobrunn as a Research Scientist. In 1990 he became Research Fellow at the Chair for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Technical University Munich. In the same year he received a Ph.D. degree (Dr.-Ing.) and in 1994 the venia legendi (Dr.-Ing. habil.), both from TU Munich.

From 1991-1994 he led the research group ‘Digital Photogram- metry’ at the same institution. Throughout 1995 he was a visiting professor of photogrammetry at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. He returned to TU Munich at the beginning of 1996, were he headed the research group ‘Image matching and object extraction’. He was awarded another visiting professorship at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland in spring 1998.

In October 1998 he was appointed Head of the Institute of Photogrammetry and GeoInformation, Leibniz Universität Hannover, where he currently leads a group of about 25 researchers, most of them funded through grants from national and international science organisations and from industry. From 2009-2011 he served as Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodetic Science. In 2012 he was on sabbatical leave and worked at the IGN-MATIS research laboratory in Paris for six months. His professional interests comprise all aspects of digital photogrammetry & remote sensing, image understanding and their connection to GIS and computer vision. His two areas of special expertise are automatic sensor orientation and object extraction from images.

Christian Heipke has successfully supervised about 35 PhD theses and has about 400 scientific publications to his name, some 90 of which appeared in peer reviewed international journals. He has acted as guest editor of major international journals in photogrammetry and remote sensing, and he is on the editorial board of various of these journals. He has organized and co-organized numerous international scientific meetings in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, GIS and computer vision, in particular the biennial ISPRS Hannover Workshop on High Resolution Earth Imaging for Geospatial Information (since 1999). He has chaired Working Groups of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) for 16 years and was vice- president of EuroSDR (European Spatial Data Research, formerly known as OEEPE) from 2004-2009, in which he was responsible for research. From 2011-2014 he was chair of the German Geodetic Commission (DGK), from 2012-2016 ISPRS Secretary General. Currently he serves as ISPRS President.

He is the recipient of the Otto von Gruber Award 1992, the most prestigious award for young scientists in photogrammetry and remote sensing, the Frederick J. Doyle Award 2012 for outstanding and sustained qualities in the profession, both offered by ISPRS, and the Photogrammetric (Fairchild) Award 2013 from ASPRS. He is an ordinary member of the learnt societies German Geodetic Commission (DGK) at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the Braunschweig Scientific Society (BWG), acatech - the German Academy for Technical Sciences, and the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Furthermore, he is a member of the German Society for Geodesy, Geoinformation and Land Management (DVW), the German Society for Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Geoinformation (DGPF), the German Society for Pattern Recognition (DAGM), the UK Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc), the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Dr. Ahmed Shaker

Dr. Ahmed Shaker

Dr. Ahmed Shaker

Ryerson University, Canada

Several times a year, Ahmed Shaker flies abroad for a conference or collaboration. Heading to locales like Spain, Hong Kong, Kuwait and his native Egypt, he has an opportunity to experience something dear to him: the sight of the earth from high above. “When I was a child, I wanted to be a pilot so I could have that view all the time,” he says.

In his research, Shaker specializes in using remote sensing to transform satellite images into highly detailed maps of the earth’s surface. “Our group is one of a few in the world using laser pulses and sensors to record both location data and the strength of the reflected energy,” he says. “We can now accurately determine the nature of surface materials and identify roads, rivers, grasslands or even lamp posts.”

Throughout his career, Shaker has led dozens of projects. His recent work involves applying cutting-edge 3D laser scanners that measure light in three wavelengths. The process enables him to automatically delineate between land and water, and has produced the first-ever laser-scanner land cover maps—innovations befitting an engineer who appreciates a good view.

Areas of Academic Interest

Multispectral LiDAR data processing, Satellite sensor modelling and image registration, Image analysis and data fusion, Image classification and segmentation, Radiometric correction of LiDAR intensity data, Applications of remote sensing in civil engineering

Dr. Charles Toth

Dr. Charles Toth

Dr. Charles Toth

The Ohio State University, USA

Senior Research Scientist Center for Mapping from the Ohio State University, Charles K. Toth holds Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Geo‐Information Science from the Technical University of Budapest, Hungary. He is a Certified Photogrammetrist (ASPRS) with 25 years of interdisciplinary research experience in geospatial science and information technology, the recipient of the ASPRS Photogrammetric Award (Fairchild), 2009, and the co‐editor of the popular book Topographic Laser Ranging and Scanning: Principles and Processing, 2008.

Research and Teaching Interest

  • Primary data acquisition and mobile mapping systems
  • Automatic sensor orientation using GPS and INS
  • Automated surface extraction
  • Integrating multisensor information
  • Digital camera systems

Dr. Nicolas Paparoditis

Dr. Nicolas Paparoditis

Dr. Nicolas Paparoditis

Champs-sur-Marne, France

Nicolas Paparoditis was appointed Director of Educational Research at the IGN (National Institute for Geographic and Forest Information) and Director of the ENSG Géomatique (National School of Geographical Sciences) in February 2017. He holds a doctorate in engineering sciences from the University of Nice-Sophia-Antipolis in 1998, holds an HDR from Paris-Descartes University and has been director of sustainable development research since 2007. Initially a research and engineering engineer at Aerospatiale from 1992 to 1997, he then worked as a lecturer and lecturer at CNGH (Graduate School of Surveyors and Topographers) from 1997 to 2002. He is responsible for a research team on 3D digitization in the Matis laboratory of the IGN from 2002 to 2009, a laboratory he runs from 2009 to 2014. He is later scientific director of the IGN, in science policy and research program development, from 2014 to 2016. Nicolas Paparoditis is a specialist in remote sensing, photogrammetry, and 3D computer vision applied to the collection of geographic information and more specifically to the digitization and 3D modeling of cities and territories. Biography updated in October 2018.